What is Malaysia’s Future

In a few more months, the Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs) will determine how we move forward to address climate change as a nation. You may be thinking, how is dealing with climate change more important that dealing with the issue of corruption and political unrest in this country.  This is because by the end of the upcoming UNFCCC happening this December, it will be a world-wide effort or rather a long term global effort to resume the responsibility in protecting our planet earth and achieve a sustainable future. Nonetheless, with the understanding that, you may still have the opinion of there are other issues more in need of our country’s attention, the only thing implied here is that this INDCs that our nation will submit publicly SHOULD NOT be taken lighter than the issue on corruption and political unrest. 

Get your explanation on INDCs in the articles below by Amalen Sathananthar and Mohammad Shakirin Bin Shahrul Jamal.

 

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Photocredit: www.cakex.org

What is INDCs? 

By Amalen Sathananthar (MYD15)

In preparation to create a new international climate agreement via the United Nation’s Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Conference of the Parties (COP21) in Paris in December 2015, participating countries, parties have agreed to publicly outline what post-2020 climate actions they intend to take under a new international agreement, known as their Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs). The INDCs will largely determine whether the world achieves an ambitious 2015 agreement and is put on a path toward a low-carbon, climate-resilient future. All INDCs submitted to the Secretariat by October 1st will be included in a synthesis report prepared by the UNFCCC Secretariat that will be released by November 1st. The report will reflect the aggregate emissions impact of available INDCs ahead of COP21.

What exactly is it?

A country’s INDC indicates to the world that the country is doing its part to combat climate change and limit future climate risks. In their INDCs, UNFCCC Parties are requested to outline the steps they are taking/will take to reduce emissions at the national level. Most INDCs pairs national policy-setting and a global framework to  determine  their collective contributions in the context of their national priorities, circumstances and capabilities towards a low-carbon, climate-resilient future.

It is important that countries follow a transparent process when preparing their INDC in order for the trust and accountability with domestic and international stakeholders be built. A good INDC should be ambitious, leading to transformation in carbon-intensive sectors and industry; transparent, so that stakeholders can track progress and ensure countries meet their stated goals; and equitable, so that each country does its fair share to address climate change. Essentially, INDCs must be clearly communicated so that domestic and international stakeholders can anticipate how these actions will contribute to global emissions reductions and climate resilience in the future.

References

Well, you see, all nations involved in the COP21 in Paris 2015, they should prepare and submit their INDCs before the Conference. On 3rd of July 2015, our close neighboring country, Singapore submitted their Climate Action Plan along with other countries such as Switzerland, Russia, Andorra, Mexico, Liechtenstein, Serbia, New Zealand, Republic of Korea, Morocco and many others. With that said, Malaysia certainly won’t want to be left behind.

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Photocredit: www.theclimategroup.org

Continue reading more about INDCs from Shakirin Bin Shahrul Jamal (MYD15)

When will we see them?

 

What makes a good INDC?

Well-designed INDCs will signal to the world that the country is doing its part to combat climate change and limit future climate risks. Countries should follow a transparent process when preparing their INDC in order to build trust and accountability with domestic and international stakeholders. A good INDC should be ambitious, leading to transformation in carbon-intensive sectors and industry; transparent, so that stakeholders can track progress and ensure countries meet their stated goals; and equitable, so that each country does its fair share to address climate change. It is important that INDCs be clearly communicated so domestic and international stakeholders can anticipate how these actions will contribute to global emissions reductions and climate resilience in the future.

An INDC should also articulate how the country is integrating climate change into other national priorities, such as sustainable development and poverty reduction, and send signals to the private sector to contribute to these efforts.

What is World Resources Institute (WRI) doing on this topic?

WRI is working on a variety of projects that aim to assist governments in preparing INDCs and help stakeholders understand and evaluate INDCs:

The Open Climate Network is working with partners in eight focus countries to evaluate current emissions trends and abatement potential out to 2030, with a view to informing initial INDCs. Following the release of the INDCs, OCN and its partners will evaluate mitigation pledges based on insights from the GHG Protocol and other tools. This data will provide critical information to decision-makers in the world’s largest economies that will enable the development of ambitious GHG reduction targets in their INDCs.

In partnership with the UNDP, WRI is working on an INDC guidance document that will support the detailed design and preparation of INDCs, including for mitigation and adaptation components and explanations of fairness and ambition.

WRI also works on INDCs through our Open Book initiative that enhances INDC transparency. The ACT 2015 project works to catalyze agreement at COP21, including the ways in which countries’ commitments and other actions from their INDCs are finalized and linked to the 2015 agreement. Our CAIT Paris Contributions Map tracks and analyzes INDCs as countries submit them.

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If this INDCs will determine the future of Malaysia, perhaps we need to stand up and voice out our opinion on in direction Malaysia should progress.  We should make sure that this matter is taken seriously to ensure that Malaysia will be put on the right path forward rather than continue to regress. 

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